Cookie Settings What Apple Pay can teach the healthcare industry | Hall & Partners
back to Big Thinking arrow
BIG THINKING

What Apple Pay can teach the healthcare industry

back to Big Thinking arrow
BIG THINKING

What Apple Pay can teach the healthcare industry

Ben Lorkin
Group Strategy Director
Hall & Partners Health

LinkedIn Twitter Email

“It’s just so easy”, my friend said when asked recently about his favourite piece of retail tech.

With his smartphone often already in his hand, Apple Pay avoids him having to find the change, count the money and do the maths. He barely needs to think – he can pay on autopilot.

This ease-of-use underpins why Apple Pay has been so successful. It’s so effortless. And it’s this ‘ease’, at least where choice exists, that can make the difference between a promising idea blossoming into an established behaviour vs. withering and falling by the wayside.

We’re creatures of habit and we don’t like change. We don’t like having to think about, yet alone adopt, new habits. We like things the way they are, not the way they could be. Change is difficult and requires time, practice and effort. We are by our nature inherently lazy, and that’s why ease is so important to eliciting behaviour change: the easier, the better. And, ideally, so easy that we don’t even consciously realise something has changed.

At Hall & Partners, we’ve long recognised the importance of ‘ease’ in facilitating behaviour change. Indeed ‘ease’ [or ‘easy’] is a key component of FRAME, our own strategic model that describes how people experience and build relationships with brands: you need to make it easy for people to do something.

The example of Apple Pay made me consider similar parallels in healthcare. Thinking just about medical devices, which require a conscious effort to use, are there innovations that compare to Apple Pay, that add value or enhance the user experience?


Health is more complicated than paying for your morning latte


 

A prime example is the incorporation of gamification into blood glucose monitors for paediatric diabetes patients. This has certainly improved compliance and helped turn a somewhat unpleasant experience, carried out several times daily, into something fun and engaging. Something more mentally easy to do.

I can think of a number of other medical device innovations that have made treatment administration easier – from wearables and diabetes pumps to home-administered subcutaneous injections in haematology/oncology.

While these advances create genuine improvement in patients’ quality of life, are any of them as effortless, as easy, as value-adding as Apple Pay? Maybe not … but then, of course, health is more complicated than paying for your morning latte, and it’s also so much more important.

Even so, when it comes to developing beyond-the-pill support and medical devices, healthcare brands should maybe ask themselves and their patients the question: “how can we make things as easy as Apple Pay?”.

LinkedIn

Twitter

Facebook

“It’s just so easy”, my friend said when asked recently about his favourite piece of retail tech.

With his smartphone often already in his hand, Apple Pay avoids him having to find the change, count the money and do the maths. He barely needs to think – he can pay on autopilot.

This ease-of-use underpins why Apple Pay has been so successful. It’s so effortless. And it’s this ‘ease’, at least where choice exists, that can make the difference between a promising idea blossoming into an established behaviour vs. withering and falling by the wayside.

We’re creatures of habit and we don’t like change. We don’t like having to think about, yet alone adopt, new habits. We like things the way they are, not the way they could be. Change is difficult and requires time, practice and effort. We are by our nature inherently lazy, and that’s why ease is so important to eliciting behaviour change: the easier, the better. And, ideally, so easy that we don’t even consciously realise something has changed.

At Hall & Partners, we’ve long recognised the importance of ‘ease’ in facilitating behaviour change. Indeed ‘ease’ [or ‘easy’] is a key component of FRAME, our own strategic model that describes how people experience and build relationships with brands: you need to make it easy for people to do something.

The example of Apple Pay made me consider similar parallels in healthcare. Thinking just about medical devices, which require a conscious effort to use, are there innovations that compare to Apple Pay, that add value or enhance the user experience?


Health is more complicated than paying for your morning latte


 

A prime example is the incorporation of gamification into blood glucose monitors for paediatric diabetes patients. This has certainly improved compliance and helped turn a somewhat unpleasant experience, carried out several times daily, into something fun and engaging. Something more mentally easy to do.

I can think of a number of other medical device innovations that have made treatment administration easier – from wearables and diabetes pumps to home-administered subcutaneous injections in haematology/oncology.

While these advances create genuine improvement in patients’ quality of life, are any of them as effortless, as easy, as value-adding as Apple Pay? Maybe not … but then, of course, health is more complicated than paying for your morning latte, and it’s also so much more important.

Even so, when it comes to developing beyond-the-pill support and medical devices, healthcare brands should maybe ask themselves and their patients the question: “how can we make things as easy as Apple Pay?”.

Ben Lorkin
Group Strategy Director
Hall & Partners Health

LinkedIn Email