Cookie Settings Do you run your family as well as you run your business?
back to Big Thinking arrow
BIG THINKING

Do you run your family as well as you run your business?

back to Big Thinking arrow
BIG THINKING

Do you run your family as well as you run your business?

Hannah Mann
Europe Managing Partner Health
Hall & Partners Health

LinkedIn Twitter Email

An experienced business leader, Hannah has expertise in market insight across healthcare, customer behaviour, advertising research and brand equity.

5 ways to apply your business skills to help your family flourish

I know some people will think I’m bonkers, but I really do believe that there’s a high degree of crossover in the skills you need to run a successful family and a successful business. Maybe I’m stating the obvious, but I see so many successful business people being guided by a totally different set of rules when it comes to their family life. Yet, business and family are no different – if you don’t properly feed and water them, they wither on the vine.

 

1) Pay attention to your stars

Exactly the same as in the workplace, if you don’t pay attention to your team of support staff, they’ll leave or get enticed somewhere else. Your spouse is probably your biggest star performer, helping you achieve your career ambitions alongside juggling the house, kids and whatever else life throws your way. You need to tell them they’re special, recognise their contribution and never take them for granted. Make sure they know how important they are and, amongst the chaos, don’t forget to say thanks.

 

 

2) Build a strong culture

Culture eats strategy for lunch! This is key within a work environment as a great culture can carry you much further than a good strategy document. And family life is no different – you need to make sure you pay attention to how you ‘show up’. If you’re grumpy, constantly say you’re tired and never have time for the kids, guess what … that’s how everyone else will behave. To help a business thrive you have to encourage fun, drive collaboration and be a source of boundless energy and inspiration. It’s no different within your family.

 

3) Offer the right incentives

If you’re tight and stingy at work, don’t pay people what they’re worth and constantly count the pennies, then people will go somewhere else where they feel more valued. It’s the same at home, so sometimes you just have to live for the moment. Screw the savings plan and go on that amazing holiday, take your partner for an expensive meal or buy them that latest thing they really want. It’s not all about material goods but there’s no point being the richest (and loneliest) person in the graveyard.

 

4) Prioritise your time

Be there when you need to be. Don’t miss those magical moments – the school assemblies, the harvest festivals, the waving off the bus for the school trip. I was with a fellow mum earlier this week who said, “If my son is sick I could hardly ask my husband to take a day off”. I thought this was sad as, first, why the hell not and, second, surely he should want to do the things that show his kids he’s there for them? Seniority in a work role is a poor excuse for not bothering to show up when it matters at home – no one is that important!

 

5) Hard work and tenacity lead to success

I know that after a hard day in the office it’s all too easy to slump on the sofa and just leave the kids to it. But if I’ve learnt one thing about raising a family it’s that it feels more like a marathon (that you didn’t do any training for) than a sprint. Sometimes you may feel like all you do is nag, nag, nag. I can’t tell you how many conversations I have with my kids about behaviour/attitude/manners etc. But at work you wouldn’t just say, “Oh, sod it! I can’t be bothered today”, so there’s no excuse to do that at home. Grit your teeth and dig deep … they’ll thank you in the long run.

So, there you have it. Make sure you invest equal time, energy and attention to both your family and work life if you want to keep those plates spinning. And going back to my first point … just picture several years down the line, when the kids have all left home and the work you once did no longer seems that relevant. You’ll certainly want to have someone else still around to share the fruits of your labour.

 

LinkedIn

Twitter

Facebook

5 ways to apply your business skills to help your family flourish

I know some people will think I’m bonkers, but I really do believe that there’s a high degree of crossover in the skills you need to run a successful family and a successful business. Maybe I’m stating the obvious, but I see so many successful business people being guided by a totally different set of rules when it comes to their family life. Yet, business and family are no different – if you don’t properly feed and water them, they wither on the vine.

 

1) Pay attention to your stars

Exactly the same as in the workplace, if you don’t pay attention to your team of support staff, they’ll leave or get enticed somewhere else. Your spouse is probably your biggest star performer, helping you achieve your career ambitions alongside juggling the house, kids and whatever else life throws your way. You need to tell them they’re special, recognise their contribution and never take them for granted. Make sure they know how important they are and, amongst the chaos, don’t forget to say thanks.

 

 

2) Build a strong culture

Culture eats strategy for lunch! This is key within a work environment as a great culture can carry you much further than a good strategy document. And family life is no different – you need to make sure you pay attention to how you ‘show up’. If you’re grumpy, constantly say you’re tired and never have time for the kids, guess what … that’s how everyone else will behave. To help a business thrive you have to encourage fun, drive collaboration and be a source of boundless energy and inspiration. It’s no different within your family.

 

3) Offer the right incentives

If you’re tight and stingy at work, don’t pay people what they’re worth and constantly count the pennies, then people will go somewhere else where they feel more valued. It’s the same at home, so sometimes you just have to live for the moment. Screw the savings plan and go on that amazing holiday, take your partner for an expensive meal or buy them that latest thing they really want. It’s not all about material goods but there’s no point being the richest (and loneliest) person in the graveyard.

 

4) Prioritise your time

Be there when you need to be. Don’t miss those magical moments – the school assemblies, the harvest festivals, the waving off the bus for the school trip. I was with a fellow mum earlier this week who said, “If my son is sick I could hardly ask my husband to take a day off”. I thought this was sad as, first, why the hell not and, second, surely he should want to do the things that show his kids he’s there for them? Seniority in a work role is a poor excuse for not bothering to show up when it matters at home – no one is that important!

 

5) Hard work and tenacity lead to success

I know that after a hard day in the office it’s all too easy to slump on the sofa and just leave the kids to it. But if I’ve learnt one thing about raising a family it’s that it feels more like a marathon (that you didn’t do any training for) than a sprint. Sometimes you may feel like all you do is nag, nag, nag. I can’t tell you how many conversations I have with my kids about behaviour/attitude/manners etc. But at work you wouldn’t just say, “Oh, sod it! I can’t be bothered today”, so there’s no excuse to do that at home. Grit your teeth and dig deep … they’ll thank you in the long run.

So, there you have it. Make sure you invest equal time, energy and attention to both your family and work life if you want to keep those plates spinning. And going back to my first point … just picture several years down the line, when the kids have all left home and the work you once did no longer seems that relevant. You’ll certainly want to have someone else still around to share the fruits of your labour.

 

Author

Hannah Mann
Europe Managing Partner Health
Hall & Partners Health

LinkedIn Twitter Email

An experienced business leader, Hannah has expertise in market insight across healthcare, customer behaviour, advertising research and brand equity.

 

04/12/2017

Why I won’t feel guilty about flexibility

10/02/2018

5 things every working parent can relate to…

08/31/2017

The importance of mentors for the working mom