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Standing with ‘Dr Thick’ on dyslexia

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BIG THINKING

Standing with ‘Dr Thick’ on dyslexia

Vanella Jackson
Global CEO
Hall & Partners

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Before joining Hall & Partners in 2004, Vanella had a successful 20-year career as an Account Planner in some of the world’s best advertising agencies including Bartle Bogle Hegarty, J Walter Thompson and AMV BBDO.

Having read the BBC News this week about Labour MP Peter Kyle (aka ‘Dr Thick’) speaking about living with acute dyslexia, I feel encouraged.

It’s about time all dyslexics stood up for their unique minds and talents.

The more and more I delve into understanding what it means to be dyslexic the more reasons I find not to be ashamed, but to be proud.

I was at an event run by The British Dyslexia Association and found myself listening intently to the brilliant Dr Helen Taylor. She explained why as human beings we have developed a broad spectrum of different kinds of minds: it helps us adapt and survive.

Some minds are great at logical, focussed, step by step implementation. Others, at the extremes of the spectrum have different skills to bring to the table.

Recently, there has been a lot of talk about the unique skills of Autism. Many companies now recognise this and are proactively trying to hire people with this skill set. There has been less talk about dyslexics, although I am encouraged to see signs that this is beginning to change.

The dyslexic mind is preoccupied with possibility, connecting ideas and creating the new. This is why thirty percent of those that attend art college are dyslexic and why dyslexics are drawn to creative industries and becoming entrepreneurs. Some of our most famous inventors and engineers are dyslexic. Albert Einstein was dyslexic.

People who are good at thinking up new solutions working alongside those who are better at implementing have helped us, as a species, to be extraordinarily good at adapting to changing environments and surviving.


Different minds create different solutions. Working together gives us the best chance of all.


In short, we need all kinds of minds to tackle the issues we face. This is particularly true right now when the world faces extraordinary upheaval and changes that are impacting the health of our planet.

If you are interested in understanding how your mind works and whether you are lucky enough to have the dyslexic gene, can I suggest you take this short and brilliant test from the wonderful charity Made By Dyslexia.

 

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Having read the BBC News this week about Labour MP Peter Kyle (aka ‘Dr Thick’) speaking about living with acute dyslexia, I feel encouraged.

It’s about time all dyslexics stood up for their unique minds and talents.

The more and more I delve into understanding what it means to be dyslexic the more reasons I find not to be ashamed, but to be proud.

I was at an event run by The British Dyslexia Association and found myself listening intently to the brilliant Dr Helen Taylor. She explained why as human beings we have developed a broad spectrum of different kinds of minds: it helps us adapt and survive.

Some minds are great at logical, focussed, step by step implementation. Others, at the extremes of the spectrum have different skills to bring to the table.

Recently, there has been a lot of talk about the unique skills of Autism. Many companies now recognise this and are proactively trying to hire people with this skill set. There has been less talk about dyslexics, although I am encouraged to see signs that this is beginning to change.

The dyslexic mind is preoccupied with possibility, connecting ideas and creating the new. This is why thirty percent of those that attend art college are dyslexic and why dyslexics are drawn to creative industries and becoming entrepreneurs. Some of our most famous inventors and engineers are dyslexic. Albert Einstein was dyslexic.

People who are good at thinking up new solutions working alongside those who are better at implementing have helped us, as a species, to be extraordinarily good at adapting to changing environments and surviving.


Different minds create different solutions. Working together gives us the best chance of all.


In short, we need all kinds of minds to tackle the issues we face. This is particularly true right now when the world faces extraordinary upheaval and changes that are impacting the health of our planet.

If you are interested in understanding how your mind works and whether you are lucky enough to have the dyslexic gene, can I suggest you take this short and brilliant test from the wonderful charity Made By Dyslexia.

 

Share this article

 

Vanella Jackson
Global CEO
Hall & Partners

LinkedIn Twitter Email

Before joining Hall & Partners in 2004, Vanella had a successful 20-year career as an Account Planner in some of the world’s best advertising agencies including Bartle Bogle Hegarty, J Walter Thompson and AMV BBDO.