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Why transformation comes in all shapes and sizes…

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BIG THINKING

Why transformation comes in all shapes and sizes…

Jerome Hancock
Partner
Hall & Partners The Modellers

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Googling ‘transformation’ returns a ton of results … over 1.5bn! And so it should – it’s a persistently common theme which impacts almost all of us, sometimes hourly! 

Given transformation is so prevalent ­– almost ‘the norm’ – you might wonder why for many it’s viewed with extremes, from excitement right through to rejection. Around this time last year I was, figuratively speaking, eating transformation for breakfast as I took on an exciting new role leading The Modellers analytics team within Hall & Partners. I faced almost complete change – in city, commute, colleagues, office, boss, culture, clients, brand challenges, opportunities, even the expenses process … the list seemed endless. But not daunting in the least. I was totally excited by what lay ahead and, almost twelve months later, I’m far from disappointed. Transformation feels great!

Talk to me, however, about the impending transformation of the Land Rover Defender – finally confirmed for launch this year – and you’ll hear a different response. I’ve got to be honest, I’m not a big fan and I haven’t even seen it.  Confession! I drive a Defender, you see, and am perfectly happy with the road noise, the excitement of driving with no airbags, the heater with two cold settings and a turning circle to rival a tanker. Not to mention its distinctive and unique shape which remains largely unchanged since 1948. Why the need for change when it’s fine as it is? OK, that is apart from the environmental issues and the road-safety concerns for drivers and pedestrians alike.

We’re creatures of habit and we don’t like change. We don’t like having to think about, yet alone adopt, new habits. We like things the way they are, not the way they could be. Change is difficult and requires time, practice and effort. We are by our nature inherently lazy, and that’s why ease is so important to eliciting behaviour change: the easier, the better. And, ideally, so easy that we don’t even consciously realise something has changed.

Of course, it’s quite likely that I’m just stuck somewhere between stages one and two of The Change Cycle™ – ‘Loss’ and ‘Doubt’ – and that JLR (Jaguar Land Rover) have me exactly where they want me at this transformational moment in time. In fact, now that I’m thinking about the Defender’s potential new looks, its new levels of comfort, safety, security and capability, and even the possibility of it being available in colour … what’s not to like?

Have I just accelerated through the other stages of change to a point where I’m now in the market for another of JLR’s finest?! No, not yet at least, but I’m certainly more open to the possibility than I first thought. And, as my last year has demonstrated, transformation can lead to great things.

 

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Googling ‘transformation’ returns a ton of results … over 1.5bn! And so it should – it’s a persistently common theme which impacts almost all of us, sometimes hourly! 

Given transformation is so prevalent ­– almost ‘the norm’ – you might wonder why for many it’s viewed with extremes, from excitement right through to rejection. Around this time last year I was, figuratively speaking, eating transformation for breakfast as I took on an exciting new role leading The Modellers analytics team within Hall & Partners. I faced almost complete change – in city, commute, colleagues, office, boss, culture, clients, brand challenges, opportunities, even the expenses process … the list seemed endless. But not daunting in the least. I was totally excited by what lay ahead and, almost twelve months later, I’m far from disappointed. Transformation feels great!

Talk to me, however, about the impending transformation of the Land Rover Defender – finally confirmed for launch this year – and you’ll hear a different response. I’ve got to be honest, I’m not a big fan and I haven’t even seen it.  Confession! I drive a Defender, you see, and am perfectly happy with the road noise, the excitement of driving with no airbags, the heater with two cold settings and a turning circle to rival a tanker. Not to mention its distinctive and unique shape which remains largely unchanged since 1948. Why the need for change when it’s fine as it is? OK, that is apart from the environmental issues and the road-safety concerns for drivers and pedestrians alike.

We’re creatures of habit and we don’t like change. We don’t like having to think about, yet alone adopt, new habits. We like things the way they are, not the way they could be. Change is difficult and requires time, practice and effort. We are by our nature inherently lazy, and that’s why ease is so important to eliciting behaviour change: the easier, the better. And, ideally, so easy that we don’t even consciously realise something has changed.

Of course, it’s quite likely that I’m just stuck somewhere between stages one and two of The Change Cycle™ – ‘Loss’ and ‘Doubt’ – and that JLR (Jaguar Land Rover) have me exactly where they want me at this transformational moment in time. In fact, now that I’m thinking about the Defender’s potential new looks, its new levels of comfort, safety, security and capability, and even the possibility of it being available in colour … what’s not to like?

Have I just accelerated through the other stages of change to a point where I’m now in the market for another of JLR’s finest?! No, not yet at least, but I’m certainly more open to the possibility than I first thought. And, as my last year has demonstrated, transformation can lead to great things.

Jerome Hancock
Partner
Hall & Partners The Modellers

LinkedIn Twitter Email