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When in Seoul | Culture, people, things to do and memorable brands
When in
Cultural Currents

South Korea is endlessly fascinating – with many unique cultural practices and attitudes defining it against the cold, reserved North. South Koreans are amongst the world’s biggest consumers of alcohol – especially hard liquor. The most popular drinks are makgeolli (rice wine), soju (distilled spirit) and beer. It’s common for Koreans to match drinks to a different food type – makgeolli with jeon (fried food), soju with samgyeopsal (belly pork) and beer with chicken. There’s been a recent trend for craft beer with local Seoul residents emerging to become microbrewers.

Public bath houses – jjimjilbang – are an essential part of Korean culture. This is where families or groups of friends gather to relax, de-stress and enjoy time together. Not only do bath houses have soaking pools, saunas and massage areas, there are also food outlets, arcades, karaoke booths and hair and nail salons – a real place for communal relaxation.

Fun fact: to respect the time in the womb, babies are automatically one year old at the time of birth, then on January 1st they gain an additional year. So, a baby born on December 31st can be two years old by January 1st!

 
 
 
 

South Korea is endlessly fascinating – with many unique cultural practices and attitudes defining it against the cold, reserved North. South Koreans are amongst the world’s biggest consumers of alcohol – especially hard liquor. The most popular drinks are makgeolli (rice wine), soju (distilled spirit) and beer. It’s common for Koreans to match drinks to a different food type – makgeolli with jeon (fried food), soju with samgyeopsal (belly pork) and beer with chicken. There’s been a recent trend for craft beer with local Seoul residents emerging to become microbrewers.

Public bath houses – jjimjilbang – are an essential part of Korean culture. This is where families or groups of friends gather to relax, de-stress and enjoy time together. Not only do bath houses have soaking pools, saunas and massage areas, there are also food outlets, arcades, karaoke booths and hair and nail salons – a real place for communal relaxation.

Fun fact: to respect the time in the womb, babies are automatically one year old at the time of birth, then on January 1st they gain an additional year. So, a baby born on December 31st can be two years old by January 1st!

an interesting thing to do

Seoul is a dense, fast-moving city and finding places of serenity can sometimes be hard – so when you do discover one it’s a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle. In summer, rent a bike or have a picnic by the Han Gang River. If you know how to order in Korean (or know someone who can) you can have food delivered to your picnic spot! Otherwise, there are plenty food and drink stalls nearby. In autumn, visit Haneul Park – these vast expansive fields of wild flowers, Eulalia (silver wild grass) and giant Sequoia trees have great views of Seoul’s main landmarks and the surrounding mountains.


Seoul is a dense, fast-moving city and finding places of serenity can sometimes be hard – so when you do discover one it’s a welcome escape from the hustle and bustle. In summer, rent a bike or have a picnic by the Han Gang River. If you know how to order in Korean (or know someone who can) you can have food delivered to your picnic spot! Otherwise, there are plenty food and drink stalls nearby. In autumn, visit Haneul Park – these vast expansive fields of wild flowers, Eulalia (silver wild grass) and giant Sequoia trees have great views of Seoul’s main landmarks and the surrounding mountains.

One local brand

Stylenanda is one of the coolest brands to originate from Seoul. A lifestyle brand born online for stylish millennials, its unique aesthetic has built a cult following using the power of imagery. The brand’s ethos is a holistic playfulness blending fashion and beauty. Stylenanda has successfully captured the essence of today’s young modern woman – trendy, feminine and bright – as well as positioning Seoul as an edgy, vibrant and creative city. This also translates to an immersive offline experience carefully crafted for the Instagram audience. Stylenanda’s themed Pink Hotel flagship store in Seoul’s Myeong-dong district is a tourist destination in itself with each level having a different concept – such as a spa and the Pink Pool Café. Everything has been directed and curated for customers to play with products while snapping and sharing their experience.

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⭐🇰🇷

With thanks to Lisa Do for her unique, cultural insights.