Warning: "continue" targeting switch is equivalent to "break". Did you mean to use "continue 2"? in /home/hallandpartners/public_html/wheninrome/wp-content/plugins/revslider/includes/operations.class.php on line 2854

Warning: "continue" targeting switch is equivalent to "break". Did you mean to use "continue 2"? in /home/hallandpartners/public_html/wheninrome/wp-content/plugins/revslider/includes/operations.class.php on line 2858

Warning: "continue" targeting switch is equivalent to "break". Did you mean to use "continue 2"? in /home/hallandpartners/public_html/wheninrome/wp-content/plugins/revslider/includes/output.class.php on line 3708
When in Shanghai | Culture, people, things to do and memorable brands
When in Shanghai
Cultural Currents

Shanghai has always been a nexus of luxury. Its large millennial population, with above-average purchasing power, doesn’t hesitate to spend on luxury goods. As a result of China’s one-child policy, millennials grew up with the privilege of their families having more resources, so they started purchasing luxury items at an earlier age and buying more frequently.

In Shanghai, a sharp generational divide exists between millennials and GenZ. Although usually still the only child and thus equally wealthy, GenZ kids grew up in a world where China had arrived as a global superpower with a relatively wealthy and stable first generation. Due to China’s standing in the international scene, GenZs tend to have more patriotic sentiment, preferring domestic brands over foreign ones.

Moreover, being highly exposed to luxury brands from a young age, they place less value on the ‘status’ previous generations associated with luxury consumption. These attitudinal differences are compounded by GenZ being digital natives. For them, shopping is interactive and immediate. Through live-streaming platforms, they are exposed seamlessly to small boutiques in Shanghai and big events like Shanghai Fashion Week.

 
 
 
 

Shanghai has always been a nexus of luxury. Its large millennial population, with above-average purchasing power, doesn’t hesitate to spend on luxury goods. As a result of China’s one-child policy, millennials grew up with the privilege of their families having more resources, so they started purchasing luxury items at an earlier age and buying more frequently.

In Shanghai, a sharp generational divide exists between millennials and GenZ. Although usually still the only child and thus equally wealthy, GenZ kids grew up in a world where China had arrived as a global superpower with a relatively wealthy and stable first generation. Due to China’s standing in the international scene, GenZs tend to have more patriotic sentiment, preferring domestic brands over foreign ones.

Moreover, being highly exposed to luxury brands from a young age, they place less value on the ‘status’ previous generations associated with luxury consumption. These attitudinal differences are compounded by GenZ being digital natives. For them, shopping is interactive and immediate. Through live-streaming platforms, they are exposed seamlessly to small boutiques in Shanghai and big events like Shanghai Fashion Week.

an interesting thing to do

The streetwear market in China has taken off due to the rising popularity of hip-hop and its ties to youth culture. In label-thirsty China, luxury brands have started forging streetwear collaborations – such as Alexander Wang with Adidas – showcasing that the affection for this market exists and that big brands are adapting to meet consumer needs. Check out YO’HOOD, Shanghai’s coolest streetwear convention. Occurring annually, it attracts big brands such as Nike, Stussy, Vans, Adidas, New Balance and Paul Frank, as well as celebrities (Pharrell Williams) and fashion influencers. Couched between New York Fashion Week and London Fashion Week, YO’HOOD attracts over 150 fashion labels, special collaborations, live performances and skateboard demonstrations – and it’s open to the public.


The streetwear market in China has taken off due to the rising popularity of hip-hop and its ties to youth culture. In label-thirsty China, luxury brands have started forging streetwear collaborations – such as Alexander Wang with Adidas – showcasing that the affection for this market exists and that big brands are adapting to meet consumer needs. Check out YO’HOOD, Shanghai’s coolest streetwear convention. Occurring annually, it attracts big brands such as Nike, Stussy, Vans, Adidas, New Balance and Paul Frank, as well as celebrities (Pharrell Williams) and fashion influencers. Couched between New York Fashion Week and London Fashion Week, YO’HOOD attracts over 150 fashion labels, special collaborations, live performances and skateboard demonstrations – and it’s open to the public.

One local brand

Douyin, a music video platform launched in 2016, has tapped into GenZ consumers. Internationally known as Tik Tok, the app has taken advantage of Weibo and WeChat’s saturation, added a livestream feature to harness the ‘see now, buy now’ model GenZ responds to. Brands with larger budgets have been working with Douyin to create campaigns that directly target GenZ. For example, Michael Kors became the first luxury fashion brand to partner with them, creating a challenge users could respond to and working with key opinion leaders that promoted their apparel and accessories.

How is your brand experienced and loved around the world?

Let us help you understand
 

⭐🇨🇳

With thanks to Nisha Bhowjwani for her unique, cultural insights.