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When in Stockholm | Culture, people, things to do and memorable brands
When in Stockholm
Cultural Currents

Whenever entering a Swedish home, it’s the custom to take off your shoes by the door – even for parties. Like the Danes, Swedes are also into their hygge, so it’s not uncommon to find a collection of ‘guest slippers’ by the door to wear around the house instead.

Summer is big in Sweden. With the sun setting around 11pm and coming back up at 2am, it’s no surprise that Stockholm takes full advantage. ‘Midsommar’ – or midsummer – is celebrated in June and is big news. You’ll usually find the city becoming a ghost town and shops staying shut over this time as the Swedes party into the very sunny hours of the morning.

Few people drink more coffee than the Swedes. In Sweden, coffee drinking is fostered through a tradition called fika – in which friends, family or colleagues meet for coffee, often with something sweet on the side. Most Swedes will enjoy at least one fika a day.

 
 
 
 

Whenever entering a Swedish home, it’s the custom to take off your shoes by the door – even for parties. Like the Danes, Swedes are also into their hygge, so it’s not uncommon to find a collection of ‘guest slippers’ by the door to wear around the house instead.

Summer is big in Sweden. With the sun setting around 11pm and coming back up at 2am, it’s no surprise that Stockholm takes full advantage. ‘Midsommar’ – or midsummer – is celebrated in June and is big news. You’ll usually find the city becoming a ghost town and shops staying shut over this time as the Swedes party into the very sunny hours of the morning.

Few people drink more coffee than the Swedes. In Sweden, coffee drinking is fostered through a tradition called fika – in which friends, family or colleagues meet for coffee, often with something sweet on the side. Most Swedes will enjoy at least one fika a day.

an interesting thing to do

Catch a ferry to Djurgården – Stockholm’s greenest island. Here you’ll find the open-air Skansen, where visitors can stroll through five centuries of Swedish houses and farmsteads and observe wild Nordic animals. The Vasa Museum is home to a giant 17th century salvaged ship, whilst Abba The Museum combines nostalgic memorabilia with quirky interactive exhibits.


Catch a ferry to Djurgården – Stockholm’s greenest island. Here you’ll find the open-air Skansen, where visitors can stroll through five centuries of Swedish houses and farmsteads and observe wild Nordic animals. The Vasa Museum is home to a giant 17th century salvaged ship, whilst Abba The Museum combines nostalgic memorabilia with quirky interactive exhibits.

One local brand

Pick-and-mix brand CandyKing – or in Sweden KaramellKungen – plays a vital part in Stockholm’s culture, as well as being a delicious treat. Every Saturday, you’ll see adults and children alike crowded around these pick-and-mix stations to take part in Lördagsgodis – ‘Saturday’s sweets’.

The tradition stems from the controversial Vipeholm Experiments, where patients at the Vipeholm Mental Hospital in Lund were allowed to eat large amounts of sweets so scientists could investigate if there was a connection between sugar and dental health. The result was the Swedish Medical Board recommending parents to limit children’s sweet intake to one day a week in order to keep the cavities at bay – Lördagsgodis!

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With thanks to Sophie Glaas for her unique, cultural insights.